WOUND CARE CHALLENGES

Patient noncompliance, bioburden and biofilm, excess MMPs, and ECM degradation all present barriers to wounds healing correctly.

PATIENT NONCOMPLIANCE

Inability and/or unwillingness to adhere to treatment plans for chronic wounds is a major barrier to healing.

  • Many patients with lower-extremity chronic wounds are unable to change their own dressings1
  • Patients with chronic wounds fear touching their own wounds and prefer that their doctor or nurse exclusively control their care1,2
  • When treatments do force patients to change their own primary dressings, wounds can be exposed to bacteria in the home that can lead to contamination

BIOBURDEN & BIOFILM

  • Acute and chronic wounds are susceptible to infection and biofilm development; as a result, early intervention to control bacterial bioburden is essential3
  • Excessive bioburden and biofilm trigger a continuous inflammatory response and lead to increased proteases (eg, MMPs) that attack granulation tissue and stall wound healing4

EXCESS MMPs

  • In healthy wound healing, proteases such as MMPs play a critical role by helping to remove damaged ECM and bacteria5,6
  • In nonhealing wounds, the bacteria in biofilm generate excess and imbalanced MMPs that can5,6:
    • Break down the ECM
    • Degrade healing proteins
    • Prolong the inflammatory phase of healing

ECM DEGRADATION

  • ECM serves as a structural scaffold for proteins and cell proliferation to support healing7
  • ECM degradation prevents the formation of the scaffold needed for cell migration and prevents proper formation of the ECM and granulation tissue7

ECM=extracellular matrix
MMP=matrix metalloproteinases

OVERCOME WOUND CARE CHALLENGES WITH PURAPLY® AM

Discover how PuraPly® AM can help you take control of the healing environment, or contact an Organogenesis Tissue Regeneration Specialist to see how PuraPly AM can help your practice.

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REFERENCES:

  1. Fife C, et al. Wounds. 2007;19(10):255-257.
  2. Zulec M, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16(4):e559.
  3. Percival SL, et al. Adv Wound Care. 2015;4(7):389-397.
  4. Frykberg RG, et al. Adv Wound Care. 2015;4(9):560-582.
  5. Carpenter S, et al. Wounds. 2016;28(6 suppl):S1-S20.
  6. Gibson D, et al. Wounds Int. 2009;1(1):1-6.
  7. Brett D. Wounds. 2008;20(12):347-356.